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Community Document Shredding Event

WOULD YOU LIKE TO GET RID OF ALL OF YOUR OLD FILES

AND NEVER HAVE TO WORRY ABOUT THEM AGAIN?

 

You need to take advantage of our

 

Community Shred Event

 

Sponsored in Partnership with Brenco Document Shredding,

Walmart, and the Elizabethtown Police Department.

 

Brenco                       

 

 

WHEN: Saturday, November 1, 2014

 

WHAT TIME: 9:00a.m.—11:00a.m.

 

WHERE: Walmart (parking lot)

                                                                          100 Walmart Drive

             Elizabethtown, KY

 

 

Brenco

“Our Business Is To Secure Your Business”

 

 

This shredding effort will be conducted by  

Brenco with their mobile shredding unit.

 

Paper only! Please do NOT include: Batteries, Pens, Plastic Bags, Cords, String, Hard Plastic Items, Metal Objects or Glass.

 

There is a 2 box maximum per customer (to keep traffic moving) but feel free to cycle back through the line as many times as you want with additional boxes. 

Paper clips, staples, rubber bands and spiral bounds are acceptable.

 

There is NO COST for this effort, but a $5 per car DONATION is requested.

 

All proceeds from this event will be donated to Warm Blessings, “providing meals to hungry people.”

 

To learn more about this organization, please visit: http://warmblessingsinc.com/

Originally Published on Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Community Survey

Purpose for Conducting the Elizabethtown Community Survey

 

The Elizabethtown Police Department wished to establish a baseline from which to measure its successes relating to fulfilling the community’s needs.  In order to do so, it was decided to implement a community-wide survey to determine the following:

·    Quality of life issues

 

·    Attitudes toward police

 

·    Recent experiences with crime in their neighborhood

 

The Police Department will use this information to develop strategies to address each of those above listed categories in such a way as to: build police/community trust, engage in deeper levels of problem identification and problem-solving, and to complement and assist in developing our five-year strategic planning document.

 

We ask that you to take a close look at the data and consider how it represents your perceptions of the three aforementioned categories. Furthermore, we invite you to send us your thoughts as they relates to the findings, and do so in such a way that we might use them to further enhance our service to the community.

 

Thank you for continued support in our efforts to provide quality service to each person who resides works or visits our community.

 

 Sincerely,

Tracy A. Schiller

Chief of Police

Elizabethtown Police Department

 

 Click HERE for survey results.


Originally Published on Wednesday, August 27, 2014

SRT Wins local competition Originally Published on Monday, July 21, 2014

MOVE OVER Campaign

ELIZABETHTOWN, Ky. —Nationwide, police officials are joining forces and turning to social media to keep emergency workers safe on the roads.

Law enforcement across the country, including Kentucky, are getting behind a new safety campaign that's gone viral.

Log on to any social media platform and you'll find the hashtag "#moveover."

Photo after photo are tweeted and posted. Many of them are showing officers or their family members asking to come home safely from their shift.

"'Move over' means if you see a trooper or a police officer on the side of the road with a car pulled over, we want you to give them a little buffer room, as in a lane if possible," said Kentucky State Police Trooper Jeff Gregory.

If traffic prevents drivers from moving over, police ask them to at least slow down.

The social media message began with the Tennessee Highway Patrol after a 25-year-old Nashville police officer was killed while working an accident on Interstate 65 last weekend.

"It happens more often than you think," said Gregory. "Over the years we've had several cruisers hit that were on the side of the road."

Fortunately, there were no serious injuries.

"Nationwide since 1988, there's been 150 policemen killed in that capacity," said Gregory.

There is a move over law. Kentucky legislators passed it in 2005 asking drivers to move over so law enforcement, emergency responders and utility trucks can do their job safely.

The hope is the new hashtag will bring new attention to that law and cause drivers to change their habits.

"It's a big movement and we're glad for it," said Gregory.

Drivers who break the move over law can be sited and fined.

Since Monday when the campaign started, hundreds of photos have been tweeted and posted on Facebook with the hashtag #moveover.



Read more: http://www.wlky.com/news/social-media-campaign-urges-drivers-to-moveover/26004168#ixzz33248vcXT

Originally Published on Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Overdoses in America

100 people die from drug overdoses in America every day and about half of
those deaths involve opioid drugs—including prescription painkillers and
heroin.

The good news is that every overdose is preventable.

Here are four actions you can take—right now—to prevent the
next opioid overdose death.

Will you please share them?

 
  1. If you know someone struggling with the disease of addiction, let them know help is available. Give them the treatment referral line phone number: 1-800-662-HELP (4357). It’s open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

  2. Learn the signs and symptoms of an overdose, and what actions to take. Download and print this simple pocket card that explains how to resuscitate someone who’s overdosing.

  3. Get rid of all unused, expired, or unneeded prescription drugs at home. Here are instructions on how to dispose of unused medicines. The DEA
    is also hosting a National Take-Back Day on April 26
    —find a take-back
    site in your neighborhood.

  4. Download and share this helpful guide on how to prevent opioid deaths in your community. The guide contains tips and steps that first responders, prescribers, people in recovery and their family members can take to save lives.

Please share these four steps with others.

No one person can end this overdose epidemic alone, but
together, we can—and will—save lives.

Gil Kerlikowske, Director, National Drug Control Policy



Originally Published on Wednesday, February 12, 2014