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SRT Wins local competition Originally Published on Monday, July 21, 2014

Civil Service Exam Notice for Police Test

Civil Service Exam Notice:

The Elizabethtown Police Department is accepting applications for Police Officer. The test will be Wednesday August 6th, 2014 at the Pritchard Community Center. Registration will begin at 8:30 a.m. with the test beginning at 9:00 a.m. sharp. No late entries will be allowed. Applications may be picked up at the police department or downloaded from www.etownpd.org and then mailed in or presented in person before the deadline. The deadline for accepting applications is noon, Monday August 4, 2014 at 300 South Mulberry St. Elizabethtown, KY. A physical agility test (PT) will be scheduled for those that successfully pass the written test. The date and time for the PT will be posted as soon as it’s confirmed so everyone has equal opportunity to know the date. Listed below are requirements and automatic disqualifiers for becoming an Elizabethtown Police Officer:

JOB QUALIFICATIONS FOR ELIZABETHTOWN POLICE OFFICER

BE A U.S. CITIZEN

21 YEARS OF AGE AT TIME OF WRITTEN TEST

HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATE OR GED

(HOME SCHOOLING DIPLOMA ALONE DOES NOT MEET THIS REQUIREMENT HOWEVER IT WILL MEET THE STANDARD IF IN CONJUNCTION WITH A 2 OR 4 YEAR DEGREE FROM AN ACCREDITED COLLEGE)

 

NO FELONY CONVICTIONS

ABLE TO READ, WRITE, UNDERSTAND ENGLISH

VALID DRIVER’S LICENSE

NOT PROHIBITED BY STATE OR FEDERAL LAW FROM POSSESSING A

FIREARM

 

HAVE NOT RECEIVED A DISHONORABLE DISCHARGE OR GENERAL

DISCHARGE UNDER DISHONORABLE CONDITIONS FROM A MILITARY

SERVICE BRANCH

 

HAVE NOT HAD A CERTIFICATION AS A PEACE OFFICER REVOKED

FROM ANOTHER STATE

 

BE ABLE TO PASS A BACKGROUND INVESTIGATION

 

BE ABLE TO PASS ALL PHYSICAL AND SUITABILITY SCREENING

EXAMINATIONS REQUIRED TO BE A POLICE OFFICER INCLUDING A POLYGRAPH EXAMINATION

 

LIVE IN HARDIN COUNTY AFTER EMPLOYMENT

 

MUST NOT HAVE ANY TATTOOS THAT WOULD BE VISIBLE WHILE

WEARING A SHORT SLEEVE UNIFORM

 

Physical Testing Requirements can be found at

http://docjt.jus.state.ky.us or

 

http://docjt.jus.state.ky.us/forms/KLEC/2009/POPS%20physical%20agility%20brochure_9-23-09_v10a1.pdf

 

Automatic Disqualifiers for Police Officer with Elizabethtown Police Department

If any of the following apply, or you would answer YES, you are not eligible for employment as a Police Officer

Conviction of a Felony

Conviction of a Misdemeanor crime again person (assault)

Use or possession of marijuana in the past two years

Use or possession of any other illegal drug in the past five years

Conviction for Driving Under the Influence in last five years

Convicted for Driving Under the Influence two or more times in lifetime

Have had two or more moving/driving violations within the last five years

Driver’s license revoked or suspended within the last five years 

Have ever been convicted of or pled guilty to a “fleeing or evading” type charge

Currently under criminal investigation

Had Police Officer status revoked or suspended in this or any other state

Had three or more “at fault” motor vehicle crashes in the last five years

Have demonstrated a pattern of not paying owed debt (poor credit habits)

Have any tattoo that would show in a short sleeve shirt.

 

 

 

Originally Published on Tuesday, July 08, 2014

MOVE OVER Campaign

ELIZABETHTOWN, Ky. —Nationwide, police officials are joining forces and turning to social media to keep emergency workers safe on the roads.

Law enforcement across the country, including Kentucky, are getting behind a new safety campaign that's gone viral.

Log on to any social media platform and you'll find the hashtag "#moveover."

Photo after photo are tweeted and posted. Many of them are showing officers or their family members asking to come home safely from their shift.

"'Move over' means if you see a trooper or a police officer on the side of the road with a car pulled over, we want you to give them a little buffer room, as in a lane if possible," said Kentucky State Police Trooper Jeff Gregory.

If traffic prevents drivers from moving over, police ask them to at least slow down.

The social media message began with the Tennessee Highway Patrol after a 25-year-old Nashville police officer was killed while working an accident on Interstate 65 last weekend.

"It happens more often than you think," said Gregory. "Over the years we've had several cruisers hit that were on the side of the road."

Fortunately, there were no serious injuries.

"Nationwide since 1988, there's been 150 policemen killed in that capacity," said Gregory.

There is a move over law. Kentucky legislators passed it in 2005 asking drivers to move over so law enforcement, emergency responders and utility trucks can do their job safely.

The hope is the new hashtag will bring new attention to that law and cause drivers to change their habits.

"It's a big movement and we're glad for it," said Gregory.

Drivers who break the move over law can be sited and fined.

Since Monday when the campaign started, hundreds of photos have been tweeted and posted on Facebook with the hashtag #moveover.



Read more: http://www.wlky.com/news/social-media-campaign-urges-drivers-to-moveover/26004168#ixzz33248vcXT

Originally Published on Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Overdoses in America

100 people die from drug overdoses in America every day and about half of
those deaths involve opioid drugs—including prescription painkillers and
heroin.

The good news is that every overdose is preventable.

Here are four actions you can take—right now—to prevent the
next opioid overdose death.

Will you please share them?

 
  1. If you know someone struggling with the disease of addiction, let them know help is available. Give them the treatment referral line phone number: 1-800-662-HELP (4357). It’s open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

  2. Learn the signs and symptoms of an overdose, and what actions to take. Download and print this simple pocket card that explains how to resuscitate someone who’s overdosing.

  3. Get rid of all unused, expired, or unneeded prescription drugs at home. Here are instructions on how to dispose of unused medicines. The DEA
    is also hosting a National Take-Back Day on April 26
    —find a take-back
    site in your neighborhood.

  4. Download and share this helpful guide on how to prevent opioid deaths in your community. The guide contains tips and steps that first responders, prescribers, people in recovery and their family members can take to save lives.

Please share these four steps with others.

No one person can end this overdose epidemic alone, but
together, we can—and will—save lives.

Gil Kerlikowske, Director, National Drug Control Policy



Originally Published on Wednesday, February 12, 2014